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Saturday, March 3, 2012 | Opening the Heart: Ibn ‘Arabi on Suffering, Compassion and Atonement | Lecture by James Morris

Part One

Part Two

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Saturday, March 3, 2012 | Opening the Heart: Ibn ‘Arabi on Suffering, Compassion and Atonement | Lecture by James Morris | 3pm | Suggested donation $10

Sometimes Ibn ‘Arabi’s Meccan Openings—despite their reputation for difficulty—offer amazingly direct and illuminating insights into life’s most basic rule-book. Certainly this is the case with his discussion of the central role of suffering in every person’s spiritual growth, and with his clarification of its key place in the nexus connecting our (mis)deeds, their painful consequences, and their ultimate fruits of compassion and spiritual growth. After introducing a few key passages outlining his teaching, we can turn to discussing and clarifying the experiences that help to bring those lessons alive.

Professor James Morris (Boston College) has taught Islamic and comparative religious studies at the Universities of Exeter, Princeton, Oberlin, and the Sorbonne, and lectures widely on Sufism, the Islamic humanities, Islamic philosophy, the Qur’an, and Shiite thought. Recent books include Ostad Elahi’s Knowing the Spirit (2007); The Reflective Heart: Discovering Spiritual Intelligence in Ibn ‘Arab?’s ‘Meccan Illuminations’ (2005); Orientations: Islamic Thought in a World Civilisation (2004); and Ibn ‘Arab?’s The Meccan Revelations (Pir Press, 2003).

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Sunday, Feb 26, 2012 | Whirling Workshop by Sakina | 3:30 – 5:30 pm

Mevlana and Music: “The sema is like a spiritual field where one can plant seeds of faith. The teaching of Mevlana depends upon and is expressed in three elements: dance, music, and love.”

The workshop will be led by Sakina, a dervish of Shaykha Fariha al-Jerrahi. Please call or email to register for the workshop. Donations are welcome.

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Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 | Whirling Workshop by Sakina | 3:30 – 5:30 pm

Mevlana and Music: “The sema is like a spiritual field where one can plant seeds of faith. The teaching of Mevlana depends upon and is expressed in three elements: dance, music, and love.”

The workshop will be led by Sakina, a dervish of Shaykha Fariha al-Jerrahi. Please call or email to register for the workshop. Donations are welcome.

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Sunday, December 18, 2011 | Memories of Muhammad: Why the Prophet Matters | Lecture by Omid Safi | 8:00 | $10

In spite of the ubiquitous claim to “follow the Sunna”, Omid Safi contends that we as Muslims have largely forgotten about the profound prophetic character of the Prophet’s mission. This presentation is an attempt to remember the profoundly transformative challenge that the Prophet represented—and represents—to the spiritual, moral, economic, and political structure of human society then and NOW. Of particular emphasis will be the mystical qualities of the Prophet, highlighted during the Heavenly Ascension (mi’raj), the forgotten legacies of Islamic art related to the Prophet, and the mandate for a holistic and indivisible sense of justice. No background knowledge required or assumed.

Omid Safi is a leading public Muslim intellectual in America. He is a Professor of Islamic Studies at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, specializing in contemporary Islamic thought and classical Islam. He is the past Chair for the Study of Islam at the American Academy of Religion, the largest international organization devoted to the academic study of religion.

Omid is an award-winning teacher and speaker, and was nominated six times at Colgate University for the “Professor of the Year” award, and before that twice at Duke University for the Distinguished Lecturer award. At the University of North Carolina, he received the award for mentoring minority students in 2009, and the Sitterson Teaching Award for Professor of the Year in April of 2010. Audiences and students alike marvel at his ability to communicate the subtleties of religion, politics, and history in an accessible, straight-forward, and humorous fashion deeply steeped in a genuine humane commitment.
He is the editor of the volume Progressive Muslims: On Justice, Gender, and Pluralism (Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 2003). In this ground-breaking volume,  he inaugurated a new understanding of Islam which is rooted in social justice, gender equality, and religious/ethnic pluralism. His work Politics of Knowledge in Premodern Islam, dealing with medieval Islamic history and politics, was published by UNC Press in 2006. His last book was published by HarperCollins, titled Memories of Muhammad, and deals with the biography and legacy of the Prophet Muhammad. He has a forthcoming volume from Princeton University Press on the famed mystic Rumi. The Carnegie Foundation recognized Omid as a leading Scholar of Islam in 2007-2008. That topic will be the topic of his next book from Harvard University Press. His volume on American Islam is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press.

He has been among the most frequently sought speakers on Islam in popular media, appearing frequently in the New York Times, Newsweek, Washington Post, PBS, NPR, NBC, CNN, and international media. He has recently been designated as the lead Islam writer for the Huffington Post.

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Wednesday, November 9, 2011 | Special Event: A Conversation between Lorna Byrne and the Islamic Community | 7:00 – 10:00 pm | $10

Please join us for a unique opportunity to meet Lorna Byrne, an Irish mystic, in conversation with Islamic leaders at this special event.

Born in Ireland, Lorna Byrne grew up in a Catholic family, and since a young age began having direct communication with angelic beings. She sees and speaks with angels every day and has done so her entire life. These experiences opened her heart to a deeper perception of the truth beyond the boundaries of religion. Lorna is a bestselling author who has travelled extensively bringing her message of faith to communities worldwide. Professor Tariq Ramadan nominated her book, Angels in My Hair,” as his book of the year in American Foreign policy magazine.

Recently Lorna has become very interested in dialoguing with Islamic leaders. This desire to meet Muslims was prompted by several experiences, one of which occurred when she saw, for the first time, a picture of Mecca and was spiritually transported by God to the Kaaba. Her experience of Mecca and of praying with Muslims has lead to Lorna’s quest to meet with Muslims from all communities. This longing was further confirmed after a second experience of meeting a young man whom she says is the holiest man living today. She confirms that this man is Muslim and will have a great role to play in the future.

During one of her travels Lorna attended a Dhikr session at Masjid al-Farah and as a result we are blessed to be hosting her a second time. We would like to welcome you to meet Lorna and take part in a dialogue with her about our faith. We feel that this dialogue could be very fruitful for the Islamic community.

Lorna says that one of the potential futures of humankind is that all countries, religions and people will come under one umbrella together and she prays for this future. Please join us in praying for this future with her.

Ticket Price: $10.00 (there are limited seats available for this event)





Masjid al-Farah is committed to bringing the living tradition of Holy Quran and the Prophet Muhammad and his heirs, Peace be upon them, to the west. We base our practice on the interpretation given by the authentic inheritors of the Prophet in the vast field of Sufism. We see Islam as a peacemaker in the dialogue between the sacred traditions and we have hosted many interfaith events. Masjid al-Farah is home to the Nur Ashki Jerrahi Sufi lineage, which has roots in both Sunni Turkey and earlier, in Shia Central Asia.

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Sunday, Nov 20, 2011 | Whirling Workshop by Sakina | 3:30 – 5:30 pm

Mevlana and Music: “The sema is like a spiritual field where one can plant seeds of faith. The teaching of Mevlana depends upon and is expressed in three elements: dance, music, and love.”

The workshop will be led by Sakina, a dervish of Shaykha Fariha al-Jerrahi. Please call or email to register for the workshop. Donations are welcome.

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Sunday, July 10, 2011 | Whirling Workshop by Sakina | 3:30 – 5:30 pm

Mevlana and Music: “The sema is like a spiritual field where one can plant seeds of faith. The teaching of Mevlana depends upon and is expressed in three elements: dance, music, and love.”

The workshop will be led by Sakina, a dervish of Shaykha Fariha al-Jerrahi. Please call or email to register for the workshop. Donations are welcome.

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Wednesday, June 8, 2011 | Rectifying God’s Name: A Chinese Muslim Approach to Remembering Allah | Lecture by James Frankel | 7 pm | Suggested Donation $10

Islam first entered China more than 1,200 years ago, but for more than a millennium it was perceived as a foreign presence.. A dramatic flowering of Chinese Muslim cultural and religious thought occurred between the 16th and 18th centuries that produced a network of scholars who wrote about Islam in classical Chinese to form a body of literature known as the Han Kit?b. The challenge of expressing Islamic religious concepts in a context devoid of any clear monotheistic principle tested the limits of their scholarship and linguistic finesse.

Looking at the diverse influences on the highly syncretic thought of Liu Zhi (ca. 1660 – ca. 1730), a Chinese Muslim literatus, we see the most systematic and sophisticated attempt to harmonize Islam with Chinese thought and provide a glimpse at Chinese Islamic metaphysics. Liu Zhi found in Sufi theories a bridge between the religio-philosophical traditions of East and West. Other references to both Chinese and Islamic sources remain obliquely embedded in his writing. A study of these various influences provides a sense of the eclectic sources of his syncretism, revealing traces of the Ibn al-‘Arabi school of thought and Wahdat al-Wujud (Oneness of Being) theory that suffuse Liu Zhi’s writings, alongside Neo-Confucian, Daoist and Buddhist concepts that approximate mystical ideas long debated in the Islamic world.

James D. Frankel holds a Bachelor’s degree in East Asian Studies and a doctorate in Religion from Columbia University. With his training in the study of religion and his specialization in Islam, his expertise is in the history of Islam in China, a field that draws upon and informs his scholarly interests in the comparative history of ideas, and religious and cultural syncretism. Dr. Frankel’s recent first book, Rectifying God’s Name: Liu Zhi’s Translation of Monotheism and Islamic Ritual Law in Neo-Confucian China (University of Hawaii Press, 2011) examines Chinese Islamic scholarship and literature of the early Qing (1644-1911) period. He has lived in China and has traveled extensively in Asia and Europe, where his research has included work with scholars and religious leaders of Muslim minority communities. As a member of the faculty of Religion at University of Hawaii at Manoa, Dr. Frankel teaches courses in Islam, comparative religion, and mysticism.

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Wednesday, June 22, 2011 | The Way of the Heart: The Life and Legacy of Hazrat Inayat Khan | A Film by Mischa Scorer | Q&A session with Sharifa Felicia Norton & Muinuddin Charles Smith, PhD | 7:00 PM | Free Admission

The Way of the Heart is a luminous chronicle of Hazrat Inayat Khan’s journey to the West and the wisdom of Sufism he transmitted, and it reminds us that divinity can be found in the depths of every heart. It sounds a note of universal harmony in response to the great need of the world today.

The film screening will be followed by a Q&A session with Sharifa Felicia Norton & Muinuddin Charles Smith, PhD

Sharifa Felicia Norton and Muinuddin Charles Smith, PhD are co-founders of the Light of Guidance Center for Sufi Studies, in NYC, and co-authors of An Emerald Earth: Cultivating a Natural Spirituality and Serving Creative Beauty in Our World. They are senior teachers in the Sufi Order Interna- tional, offering retreats and workshops internationally.

Please also visit the site for the film: http://www.sufiorder.org/way_of_heart/