Browsing Category

lecture

events, lecture

Saturday, March 16, 2019 | “Safe Harbors” : Exploring Women’s Spaces of Solace and Refuge in American Islam | A talk by Sylvia Chan-Malik | 3 pm | $10

“Safe Harbors” : Exploring Women’s Spaces of Solace and Refuge in American Islam

A talk by Sylvia Chan-Malik / Saturday, March 16, 2019 / 3 pm / $10



Tickets will be available at the door.
In her talk, Sylvia Chan-Malik discusses how issues of safety and solace—which are at once physical, emotional, and spiritual—have been central to women’s engagements with Islam in the United States. In particular, she will address how spiritual practices of Islam and women’s desires to engage Divine Love have operated as and produced sites of refuge from the effects of racism, sexism, poverty, and other societal ills at various moments in time. Borrowing author Toni Morrison’s concept of the “safe harbor,” Dr. Chan-Malik’s talk will discuss how such spaces of safety have shifted and evolved for various communities of U.S. Muslim women across the past century, how seeking solace is intertwined to women’s desires for justice, and what lessons we may learn from how U.S. Muslim women have historically sought refuge in Islam.
Sylvia Chan-Malik is Associate Professor in the Departments of American and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, where she directs the Social Justice Program and teaches courses on race and ethnicity in the United States, Islam in/and America, social justice movements, feminist methodologies, and multiethnic literature and culture in the U.S. She is the author of Being Muslim: A Cultural History of Women of Color in American Islam (NYU Press, 2018), which offers an alternative narrative of American Islam in the 20th-21st century that centers the lives, subjectivities, voice, and representations of women of color. Her writings are also featured in numerous anthologies, including With Stones in Our Hands: Writings on Muslim, Racism, and Empire (UMinn Press, 2018), Routledge Handbook of Islam in the West(Routledge, 2015), and The Cambridge Companion to American Islam (Cambridge, 2013), and in scholarly journals, such as AmerasiaCUNY ForumJournal of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion, and The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She speaks frequently on issues of U.S. Muslim politics and culture, Islam and gender, and racial and gender politics in the U.S., and her commentary has appeared in venues such as Slate NewsThe InterceptDaily BeastPRI, Huffington Post, Patheos, Religion News Service, and others. She holds a Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Mills College.
events, lecture

Saturday, January 26, 2019 | Radical Love: Teachings from the Islamic Mystical Tradition | Talk with Omid Safi | 3 pm | $10

Radical Love: Teachings from the Islamic Mystical Tradition

Talk with Omid Safi / Saturday, January 26, 2019 / 3 pm / $10

ONLINE TICKET SALE HAS ENDED. 

There will only be a limited number of tickets available at the door on Saturday and they will SELL OUT quickly so please arrive when doors open at 2:30 pm.

We are very excited to once again host Omid Safi at Dergah al-Farah. He will be sharing with us from his most recent book, Radical Love: Teachings from the Islamic Mystical Tradition.

Omid Safi is Professor of Islamic Studies at Duke University specializing in contemporary Islamic thought and spirituality. He is a leading Muslim public intellectual who is committed to the intersection of spirituality and social justice.    He has been invited by the family of Dr. King to speak at Ebenezer Church on the relevance of Dr. King for today’s America.  Omid is the editor of Progressive Muslims: On Justice, Gender, and Pluralism in which he inaugurated a new understanding of Islam that is rooted in social justice, gender equality and religious/ethnic pluralism.  His Memories of Muhammad is an award-winning biography of the Prophet Muhammad.   His most recent book is Radical Love:  Teachings from the Islamic Mystical Tradition (published by Yale).   Omid often appears as an expert on Islam in the New York Times, Newsweek, Washington Post, PBS, NPR, NBC, BBC, CNN and other outlets . He is a recent columnist for On Being, and now has a podcast(“Sufi Heart”) at Be Here Now.  He leads a spiritually oriented adult tour to Turkey and Morocco called Illuminated Tours (http://www.illuminatedtours.com) which is open to people of all faith backgrounds. 

lecture

Friday, November 9, 2018 | “He is beautiful, and He loves beauty”: Beauty and the Mysteries of Love and Persistence | Lecture by Dr. James Morris | 8:00 pm | Admission $15 – Tickets available at door

“He is beautiful, and He loves beauty”: Beauty and the Mysteries of Love and Persistence

Lecture by Dr. James Morris
Friday, November 9, 2018 / 8:00 pm
Admission: $15 (Tickets available at door)

Throughout life, moments of transforming revelation and spiritual insight—of dhikr Allah—arrive in very different forms and contexts, sometimes serendipitous, sometimes the fruits of long practice and meditation.  While music and poetry, calligraphy and sacred architecture are perhaps the most influential and familiar forms of spiritual expression in Islamic civilization, visual arts have often played similar roles.  The extraordinary miniature painting that we will explore on this occasion is a kind of Islamic “mandala”—a comprehensive, intentionally highly personal and individualized evocation of the human condition in all its levels and dimensions.  And its imagery is largely recognizable from the masterworks of Islamic mystical poetry, together with their own root symbols in the Qur’an and hadith.  In this session, we can share what each participant recognizes and discovers in contemplating this complex, vibrantly cinematic image of the ways each of us gradually discovers the spiritual meaning, direction, and inherent promises of life.

Professor James Morris (Boston College) has taught Islamic and comparative religious studies at the Universities of Exeter, Princeton, Oberlin, and the Sorbonne, and lectures widely on Sufism, the Islamic humanities, Islamic philosophy, the Qur’an, and Shiite thought. Recent books include Ostad Elahi’s Knowing the Spirit (2007); The Reflective Heart: Discovering Spiritual Intelligence in Ibn ‘Arabi’s ‘Meccan Illuminations’ (2005); Orientations: Islamic Thought in a World Civilisation (2004); and Ibn ‘Arabi’s The Meccan Revelations (Pir Press, 2003).

 

events, lecture

Friday, September 14, 2018 | The Journey of an American Sufi | A talk by Shaykh Abdur Rasheed al-Mukashfi | 8:00 pm | Free Admission

The Journey of an American Sufi
A talk by Shaykh Abdur Rasheed al-Mukashfi
Friday, September 14 / 8 pm / Free Admission

Shaykh Abdur Rashid is the founder and director of The Mukashfi Institute of America, in Brooklyn, a branch of the Mukashfi Qadiriyya Sufi Order in Sudan. The Shaykh studied 5 years in Sudan and received permission to teach Islam and its inner sciences in America. He is a “son of New York” as his journey has taken him full circle through the Black Panther Party in his youth, the Nation of Islam, the community of Imam Warith D. Muhammad, living in Medina Munawara, joining a Sufi order in Sudan and returning to community activism in New York City. His specialty is interfaith dialogue and purification of the heart.

lecture, past

Friday, August 3, 2018 | Sufism and the Religion of Love, from Rabi‘a to Ibn ‘Arabi | Lecture by Dr. Leonard Lewisohn | 8:00 pm

Sufism and the Religion of Love, from Rabi‘a to Ibn ‘Arabi
Lecture by Dr. Leonard Lewisohn
Friday. August 3 / 8 pm

$15 – Tickets will be available at the door – Doors will open at 7:30 pm

One day in pre-eternity a ray of your beauty
Shot forth in a blaze of epiphany.
Then Love revealed itself and cast down
A fire which razed the earth from toe to crown.
– Hafiz

“The religious conscience of Islam is centred upon a fact of meta-history” wrote Henry Corbin, referring here to the pre-eternal covenant mentioned in the Qur’an (VII: 172), where God asks the yet uncreated souls of Adam’s offspring, “Am I not your Lord?” and the souls in their pre-creational state, reply: “Yes (bala),” thus acknowledging Him as their Lord. The entire mythopoetic romance of Sufism developed out of this primordial, pre-eternal covenant (mithaq) between man and God. Apropos of this verse, one of the later theoreticians of the Sufi erotic religion (Ruzbihan Baqli, d. 606/1210) was thus to comment how “the spirits of the prophets and saints became intoxicated from the influence of hearing the divine speech and seeing the beauty of majesty. They fell in love with the eternal beloved, with no trace of temporality.” Referring to another Qur’anic verse: “He loves them and they love Him” (V: 54), another Sufi theorist, Ahmad Ghazali (d. 520/1126), would compare God’s love for mankind (“them”) to a seed sewn in pre-Eternity sprouting up in the tree of “they love Him.” There is only one love that pervades the hearts of men according to Ghazali, for all love is ultimately spiritual, all love ultimately originating in the “Spirit’s Court.”

Sufis know that to experientially apprehend God’s love for humankind one must practice works of devotion, leading to “proximity caused by supererogotative works of worship” (qurb al-nawafil), as encapsulated in the famous hadith qudsi, often referred to as the hadith of ‘intimacy with God’: “My slave draws near to Me through nothing I love more than that which I have made obligatory for him. My slave never ceases to draw near to Me through supererogatory acts until I love him. And when I love him, I am his hearing by which he hears, his sight by which he sees, his hand by which he grasps, and his foot by which he walks. And when he approaches a span, I approach a cubit and when he comes walking I come running.”

The idea of God’s pre-eternal love passionate love (‘ishq) expressed in this hadith, the above-cited verses as well as many other passages from the Qur’an, infiltrated the spirituality of Islam from the very earliest period. In this lecture I will sketch the basic contours of the theories and doctrines of Sufi erotic theology and the religion of love in the Qur’an and Hadith. Based on numerous references to the Muslim scripture, five key themes eventually evolved—Pre-eternal Love and Beauty, Salvation through Love, Love of Beauty, Charity and Love of one’s Neighbour, and Romantic Love/Erotic Love—into fundamental topoi of what later became known as the ‘Religion of Love’ (in Arabic: din al-Hubb; in Persian: madhhab-i ‘ishq) in Sufism.

My discussion of love in the Sufi tradition commences with the love mysticism in the Qur’an followed by a survey of the thought of one of the key founders of early Sufi ascetic theology, Rabi‘a Adawiyya (d. ca. 162-176/788-92), who figures as supreme mistress of the Sufi religion of love, before chronologically surveying the Sufi theosophy of Eros and the erotic in Sufism over the ensuing five hundred years. The talk ends with the final blossoming and culmination of Islam’s ‘religion-of-love mysticism’ in the thought of Ibn ‘Arabi (d. 638/1240). Lastly, several pages of examples (provided in handouts) of how topoi relating to the ‘Religion of Love’ was illustrated in verse by some thirty odd classical Persian poets, from Humam-i Tabrizi (d. 714/ 1314) to ‘Abd al-Rahman Jami (d. 898/1492) will be discussed.

Dr. Leonard Lewisohn is Senior Lecturer in Persian and Iran Heritage Foundation Fellow in Classical Persian and Sufi Literature at the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies of the University of Exeter in England where he currently teaches Islamic Studies, Sufism, history of Iran, as well as courses on Persian texts and Persian poetry in translation. He specializes in translation of Persian Sufi poetic and prose texts.

He is the author of Beyond Faith and Infidelity: The Sufi Poetry and Teachings of Mahmud Shabistari (London: 1995), and the editor of three volumes on The Heritage of Sufism, vol. 1: The Legacy of Mediæval Persian Sufism, vol. 2: Classical Persian Sufism from its Origins to Rumi Classical Persian Sufism from its Origins to Rumi, vol. 3 (with David Morgan): Late Classical Persianate Sufism: the Safavid and Mughal Period (Oxford: 1999)—covering a millennium of Islamic history.

He is editor of the Mawlana Rumi Review, an annual journal devoted to Jalal al-Din Rumi (d. 1273). He is also editor (with Christopher Shackle) of The Art of Spiritual Flight: Farid al-Din ‘Attar and the Persian Sufi Tradition (London: I.B. Tauris 2006), co-translator with Robert Bly of The Angels Knocking on the Tavern Door: Thirty Poems of Hafiz (New York: HarperCollins 2008), editor of Hafiz and the Religion of Love in Classical Persian Poetry (London: I.B. Tauris 2010), and editor of The Philosophy of Ecstasy: Rumi and the Sufi Tradition (Bloomington, Indiana: World Wisdom 2014), and co-editor (with Reza Tabandeh) of Sufis and Mullahs: Sufis and their Opponents in the Persianate World (forthcoming 2018).

Dr. Lewisohn has contributed articles to the Encyclopedia of Love in World Religions, Encyclopedia of Islam (2nd and 3rd editions), Encyclopædia Iranica, Encyclopædia of Philosophy, 2nd Edition, Encyclopædia of Religion, 2nd Edition, Iran Nameh, Iranian Studies, African Affairs, Islamic Culture, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society and the Temenos Academy Review.