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concert, events

Sunday, December 4, 2016 | A NIGHT OF PERSIAN SUFI MUSIC with Pejman Tadayon Sufi Ensemble | 7:00 PM | Advance Tickets: $20

Music is the art of arts and the science of all sciences; and it contains the fountain of all knowledge within itself. 
–Hazrat Inayat Khan

Barbara Eramo: Lead Vocal, Ukulele
Pejman Tadayon: Oud, Kamanche, Vocal
Stefano Saletti: Buzuki, Oud, Vocal
Featuring: Giovanni Lo Cascio: Percussions

Pejman Tadayon’s ensemble merges the three disciplines that best express the essence of Sufism: music, dance and poetry. Persian Sufi music consists of devotional compositions inspired by the verses of mystic poets such as Rumi, Hafiz, and Sa’adi, among others. Music is also the basis of the Sema, the ceremony of the whirling dervishes. The beauty and sacredness of Sufi music and dance represent the yearning for union with the divine.

Pejman Tadayon is a musician, composer and painter. He is the director of the Pejman Tadayon Ensemble. He has released several music albums, including Universal Sufi Music. Pejman plays the oud, kamancheh, ney, daff, and setar. He is also an innovative painter and the creator of pittura sonora, paintings that are musical instruments with strings that can be played. Born in Esfahan, Iran, Pejman lives and creates in Rome, Italy.

Barbara Eramo is a classically trained opera singer and musician whose evocative melodies seek the expression of pure emotion. Barbara gave voice and sound to the inspiring mages of Emily Dickinson’s poems in her solo album “Emily.”

Stefano Saletti is a composer and musician of traditional Mediterranean music. He is a vocalist, a buzuki and an oud player. Together with Barbara Eramo, Stefano Saletti worked on Hector Zazou’s contemporary-Oriental version of I Feel Love song, featured on the Buddha Bar XIII compilation.

Many say that life entered the human body by the help of music, but the truth is that life itself is music.
Hafiz

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Friday, October 28, 2016 | Book EVENT: Lifting the Boundaries: Muzaffer Efendi and the Transmission of Sufism to the West | A conversation with the author Gregory Blann | 7:00 – 9:00 pm | Suggested donation $10

This book chronicles the life of Muzaffer Efendi and provides an account of the rich legacy of Sufi teachings which he offered as a gift to the West. Like Bodhidharma’s transmission of Zen Buddhism to China in the fourth century, Muzaffer Efendi is honored as an important modern pioneer in the transmission of authentic Islamic mysticism to the United States. The teachings of Sufism are love-centered and pacifist, rather than penal-centered and retributive, a much needed balance to the restrictive and often violent interpretation of Islam so often featured in the world media today.

This new edition of Lifting the Boundaries revises and expands the 2005 first edition, offer- ing a substantial amount of new material and photographs. The new edition incorporates nearly a decade of further research, more interviews and input from Muzaffer Efendi’s intimate companions and family members, as well as additional Sufi teachings from archival recordings of Efendi’s sohbets in America.

Gregory Blann has been an active student of Sufism and the world’s religions for over three decades. He received initiation from Pir Vilayat Khan in the Sufi Order International in 1980 and served as a representative in that order for a number of years. In 1990, he received bayat (initiation) in the Halveti-Jerrahi Order from Sheikh Nur al-Jerrahi (Lex Hixon), and also studied with Safer Efendi. He was given the name Muhammad Jamal, and became a Jerrahi sheikh in 1994. He worked closely with Sheikh Nur for four years, translating the traditional mystic hymns of the Jerrahis from Turkish into English, to be sung by dervishes in the West.

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Sunday, October 23, 2016 | Whirling Workshop by Sakina | 3:30 – 6:30 pm | Registration Required

Please let us know of your intention to come as soon as you can.

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Mevlana and Music: “The sema is like a spiritual field where one can plant seeds of faith. The teaching of Mevlana depends upon and is expressed in three elements: dance, music, and love.”

The workshop will be led by Sakina, a dervish of Shaykha Fariha al-Jerrahi. Please call or email to register for the workshop. Donations are welcome.

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Friday, September 30, 2016 | SPECIAL EVENT: Birthday Celebration – Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi + Special Guest Oruç Güvenç | 6:00 – 10:00 pm | Please RSVP

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birthday celebration
mevlana jalaluddin rumi
friday, september 30, 2016

6:00 – 7:15 pm
whirling workshop

7:30 – 9:00 pm
celebration
sema ceremony
poetry

special guest: oruç güvenç

9:00 – 10:00 pm
dinner

all are welcome
please rsvp

nur ashki jerrahi community
dergah al-farah
245 west broadway
new york, ny 10013

info@nurashkijerrahi.org
212 966 9773

dergah al-farah
is located in tribeca – lower manhattan
cross streets: white & walker street
subway: a / c / e train to canal street
or the 1 train to franklin street

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Saturday, April 9, 2016 | SOLD OUT: An Intimate Evening of Traditional Trance Music From Morocco with Innov Gnawa | 8:00 pm – midnight

THIS SHOW IS SOLD OUT!

The lila is a healing ritual of song, music, dance, costume, and incense performed by the Gnawa people of Morocco. It takes place over the course of an entire night and this is why it is called lila (layla), which means night in Arabic. Invocations to God, the Prophet Muhammad and saints, including Syed Bilal, are invoked in order to purify the atmosphere and intentions for the ritual. The repetitive rhythm of the sintir and castanets produces a deep meditative trance state (jadba), moving some to dance. The Maalem (master) uses specific sounds and colors to guide participants through a healing journey, especially when an illness concerns an imbalance with a master protector spirit (melk).

The Gnawa lila is similar to the hadra ceremonies of other Moroccan Aissawa, Hamadsha and Jilala Sufis, however with some key differences. Since the Gnawa’s ancestors were neither literate nor speakers of Arabic, they do not begin with awrad or prayer texts, but instead they remember, through song and dance, the Gnawa of times past, their lands of origin and the experiences of their slave ancestors from various areas in Africa. Their songs tell a tale of separation, loneliness and ultimate redemption.

Innov Gnawa – Toura Toura from remix-culture on Vimeo.